Austin's Morning News

NY TIMES, THE EDITORIAL It would be hard to overstate the importance of yesterday’s ruling by the Supreme Court that the federal government has the authority to regulate the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases produced by motor vehicles. It is a victory for a world whose...
SYRACUSE, New York (AP) -- A school district violated a fourth-grader's constitutional rights to free speech and equal protection by refusing to allow her to distribute "personal statement" fliers carrying a religious message, a federal judge has ruled. The Liverpool Central...
By LISA SANDBERG Copyright 2007 Houston Chronicle Austin Bureau AUSTIN — Several prosecutors voiced concerns Monday about the release of 550 juveniles from Texas Youth Commission facilities beginning this week, saying the decision sets a bad example and could spark an increase...
Apr 1st 2007 1:09AM by David Knowles When George W. Bush took office, he and his wife quickly set about reversing what they saw as a glaring wrong committed by the Clintons. They restored a sense of "tradition" to the role of first lady. In other words, Mrs. Bush would steer...
By Jerry Seper THE WASHINGTON TIMES Two illegal aliens plan a multimillion-dollar civil rights lawsuit against a Texas deputy who was sentenced to prison over an April 2005 incident in which the lawman shot at an alien-smuggling vehicle that he said had just tried to run him...
Ruth Campbell Staff Writer Midland Reporter-Telegram Texas House of Representatives to vote on bill today. A bill that would make sobriety checkpoints legal is up for its first public hearing in the Texas House of Representatives today. But the proposal may raise more questions...
By BILL PENNINGTON Published: March 31, 2007 For decades, they stood by safe and smiling, a fixture on America’s sporting sidelines. But today’s young cheerleaders, who perform tricks once reserved for trapeze artists, may be in more peril than any female athletes in the country...
They swab the cheeks of strangers and pluck hairs from corpses. They travel hundreds of miles to entice their suspects with an old photograph, or sometimes a free drink. Cooperation is preferred, but not necessarily required to achieve their ends. If the amateur genealogists of...
By Natalie Armstrong TORONTO (Reuters) - Bullies are no longer content to taunt their victims in the playground but are turning to cyberspace, according to Canadian researchers. They are using e-mail, text messaging and social networking sites in new forms of victimization...