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Blog > The Jeff Ward Show > Texas Governor Rick Perry will dispatch the National Guard to U.S. border with Mexico at the cost of $12 million a month

Texas Governor Rick Perry will dispatch the National Guard to U.S. border with Mexico at the cost of $12 million a month

Texas Governor Rick Perry will announce this afternoon that he's deploying up to 1,000 Texas National Guard troops to his state's southern border, which is also the U.S. border with Mexico.

According to a memo leaked late last night, the executive action will cost Texas taxpayers $12 million a month.

State Senator Juan 'Chuy' Hinojosa, a Democrat who represents border town McAllen, confirmed to The Monitor that Perry would make the move today.

 
 

 

Already, Perry has instructed the Texas Department of Public Safety to increase personnel in the Rio Grande River Valley area at a weekly cost of $1.3 million.

The rise in border protection measures follows a surge of Central American children streaming into the U.S. from Mexico.

More than 57,000 immigrant children, many of whom are unaccompanied, have illegally entered the country since last year, and the government estimates that approximately 90,000 will arrive by the close of this year.

U.S. Border Patrol has been overloaded by the deluge, and the federal government is quickly running out of money to care for the children.

Congress is in the process of reviewing a $3.7 billion emergency funding request from President Barack Obama that would appropriate additional money to the agencies involved, but House Republicans remain skeptical of the president's plan.

Roughly half of the money Obama's asking for would go toward providing humanitarian aid to the children while relatively little would go toward returning the them to their home countries.

Furthermore, Republicans would like to see changes to a 2008 trafficking law that requires the government to give children from non-contiguous countries who show up at the border health screenings and due process before they can be sent home. The judicial process often takes months, and even years, clogging up courts and slowing down the repatriation process.

The president had initially planned to include a revised version of the 2008 legislation in his request to Congress that would have allowed the Department of Homeland Security to exercise the 'discretion' to bypass the current process by giving children the option to voluntarily return home. But Obama backed down at the last minute after receiving negative feedback from Democratic lawmakers.

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