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Blog > The Jeff Ward Show > Wasting time on the social networks is linked to low self-esteem

Wasting time on the social networks is linked to low self-esteem

Next time you're in a bad mood, don’t turn to Facebook to cheer you up.

Research has revealed that the longer you spend procrastinating on the social networking site, the more miserable you will become.

This is because we recognise we're wasting our time on the site, and this lowers our self-esteem.

 
Researchers from University of Innsbruck in Austria asked 300 English and German Facebook users to take a series of tests. The first asked how much time they had spent on Facebook, and to rate their mood. The second asked some participants to spend 20 minutes on the social network

Researchers from University of Innsbruck in Austria asked 300 English and German Facebook users to take a series of tests. The first asked how much time they had spent on Facebook, and to rate their mood. The second asked some participants to spend 20 minutes on the social network

 

The research contradicts Facebook’s own controversial study, published last month, which revealed posts on the site can have a positive and negative effect.

LONELY PEOPLE MORE LIKELY TO OVERSHARE ON FACEBOOK

Australian researchers from Charles Sturt University in New South Wales, Australia studied the profiles of 608 female Facebook users.

According to the researchers, ‘half (308) were categorised as “connected” and the remaining 308 users were categorised as “lonely”; based on clearly stating this feeling in their latest wall posting.’

The study then monitored the publicly available aspects of the profile to see if there was a relationship between loneliness and self-disclosure.

Half of those who were categorised as lonely were more likely to include more personal information on their accounts.

This ranged from their relationship status to their address and phone number.

One in eight lonely users also listed their favourite book and film.

For the more recent experiment, a total of 300 English and German-speaking participants were asked by researchers from the University of Innsbruck to take two tests to see how Facebook affected their mood.

In the first, they were asked how much time they had spent on Facebook that day, before being asked to rate their mood.

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